The Oldest Boxing Club in all of Britain…

Set in what is historically one of the poorest parts of London in the area of Bethnal Green, this former Victorian Bathhouse was turned into the Repton Boxing Club in 1884. Because boxing requires little or no equipment (in the past bare-knuckle fighting was common), it gave poor and working-class men a chance to gain both fortune and recognition. The Club’s Motto was “No guts… no glory”, which meant that having a tough reputation was likely to get you somewhere, no …

Beachwear in the Roaring 20s!

This is a repost of one of the most popular blog posts from LeeStraussBooks.com What is better than a Summer day on the beach? Going to the beach or the local swim hole was a popular activity in the 1920s. Whether one actually went swimming or not, everyone wanted to be seen in their fashionable beach wear. Swimwear was originally made out of wool in the early 1920s. However this wouldn’t last for long, it was the roaring twenties after …

Women’s rights in the 1920s – How much do you know?

This is a repost of one the most popular blog posts at LeeStraussBooks.com. I hope you enjoy it! The ‘Roaring Twenties’ introduced a wave of industrial and cultural change in both the US and England: new dances, new music, and more significantly, new attitudes towards women’s rights. Many of these changes were sparked by the extensive role that women played in the workforce during WWl. Growing employment opportunities for women enabled them to gain financial independence and emboldened them to view …

Marriage & Divorce in the 1920s

The Ginger Gold Mystery blogs will feature inside news and scoops about the world of Ginger Gold and all things 1920s. Some of the posts will be reposts from LeeStraussBooks.com. I’m looking forward to sharing my passion about this era, and Ginger Gold in particular, with you! (This is a repost of one of the most popular blog posts from LeeStraussBooks.com) During the 1920s there was more money and more social freedom, especially for women, than ever before. It was …